Chlorine vs Ozone use in swimming pools?

How chlorine in swimming pools is giving children ASTHMA, leading expert warns

By Angela Epstein

Why on earth are we still using chlorine in our swimming pools? Chlorine is a potent irritant for anyone who has eczema – which means that millions of Britons who suffer from this common skin condition are prevented from enjoying a pleasurable, healthy – and often very cheap – leisure activity.

What’s more, it’s actually potentially harmful – some studies have found that the chlorine used in pools can increase a youngster’s risk of asthma up to six-fold. Rates of hay fever and other types of allergies are also said to be increased.

Meanwhile scientists believe that commonly-found airborne chemicals, such as chlorine from pools and compounds found in cleaning products, could be behind the five-fold increase in inherited allergies during the past 50 years: exposure to these chemicals may be altering an unborn child’s immune system, leaving them more sensitive to conditions such as eczema, asthma and hay fever.

Chlorine is a potent irritant for anyone who has eczema. Millions of Britons who suffer from this skin condition

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Chlorine is a potent irritant for anyone who has eczema. Millions of Britons who suffer from this skin condition

 

Babies may be at particular risk of asthma because their lungs are still developing and they tend  to swallow irritant-laden water while swimming.

And a study of 50 elite athletes, published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, found that almost all of the swimmers in the group had inflamed lung tissue, with those who spent the most time at the pool showing the most changes. Could this have been linked to their exposure to chlorine – since the toxic by-products of chlorine settle at surface level, just where they would be breathed in?

Admittedly, more research is needed on this potential link, but I know from my dermatology clinics there are many people who are unable to go swimming because chemicals in the water severely irritate their skin.

Of course, if we want our swimming pools to be clean and hygienic, then they need to be treated with a strong disinfectant to keep them free from bacteria.

On the other hand, with soaring rates of obesity among both children and adults, there is a societal obligation to encourage people to exercise and keep fit.

In fact we could resolve this seemingly unresolvable problem – keeping our pools both clean and eczema-friendly – if we junked traditional cleaning chemicals such as chlorine and bromine and replaced them instead with ozone filtration.

Babies may be at particular risk of asthma because their lungs are still developing

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Babies may be at particular risk of asthma because their lungs are still developing

 

Chemicals such as chlorine disinfect pools but, as a by-product of the process, they also combine with the detritus of swimmers – dead skin, bacteria, urine, sweat and body oils – to form substances known as chloramines.

It is these chloramines, not the chlorine itself, that are responsible for eye and nose irritation, skin problems and the typical pungent swimming pool smell.

With ozone filtration, ozone gas – a form of oxygen – is pumped into the water, where it reacts immediately with the contaminants. It acts as a flocculent, that is, it causes the contaminants to remain in a suspended state so that they can be easily removed by the standard water filtration process – without producing skin-irritating by-products.

This cleaning system is equally, if not more, effective and is much kinder to skin.

‘Chlorine is potentially harmful – some studies have found that the chlorine used in pools can increase a youngster’s risk of asthma up to six-fold’

Yet just a handful of public  pools in London and two in Yorkshire have this superior cleaning system.

Without a change in statute requiring public pools to switch  to ozone filtration, nothing will  get done.

However, despite my many attempts to lobby MPs about initiating such a change, I’m met with either polite disinterest or glassy-eyed indifference – even though I sit on an all-party Parliamentary committee on skin.

There haven’t been attempts to field even a feeble fight about the cost, though this would only amount to the higher initial  capital cost of installing a new filtration system.

Once in place, ozone filtration could reduce the ongoing operating and maintenance costs because it is less damaging to  the infrastructure of a pool  than chlorine.

And when you consider the incalculable and potentially fatal cost of a child who fails to learn to swim because their eczema precluded them from getting into the local pool, then it doesn’t take much to do the maths.

Suffering with red, itchy, angry skin is difficult enough.

Not being able to take a swim when a solution exists to this mounting problem is, quite  simply, discrimination.

Andrew Wright is professor  of dermatology at the University  of Bradford.

Ozone-boosted wastewater treatment clears tough pollutants

Water technology company, Xylem, has launched wastewater treatment technology that combines ozone-treatment and a biologically active filtration system. The company claims it removes currently difficult-to-treat pollutants including pharmaceuticals and hormonally active compounds.

Xylem’s Leopold Oxelia optimises wastewater treatment for discharge into sensitive waters and direct potable reuse according to the Switzerland-based company. Xylem claims pollutants like personal care products, active pharmaceuticals and hormone disrupting compounds can be removed cost effectively from a water stream using Xylem’s Leopold Oxelia.

The company says this multi-barrier removal opens up more options for water reuse, including industrial use, groundwater recharge, agriculture and even direct potable reuse. The system uses ozone to oxidise organic pollutants to be digested by microorganisms in the filtration system. “Unlike other treatment systems, the compounds are not just concentrated in another waste stream – they are destroyed,” said product manager with Xylem Anton Callery.

Xylem claims the new system makes effluent suitable for direct discharge into the most sensitive aquatic ecosystems.

It claims also that ozone-enhanced, biologically active filtration has lower capital costs than reverse osmosis-based systems and, because the ozone technology do not produce another waste stream requiring further treatment, operations are simpler and more cost efficient.

Tightened regulations, such as Switzerland’s, recently imposed requirement through federal water protection laws of treatment of “contaminants of emerging concern” require advanced systems to reduce trace organics. Xylem says its latest product “can be used to upgrade existing wastewater treatment plants to meet new regulations.”

It says Leopold Oxelia is suitable for municipal wastewater tertiary applications of more than 5 Ml/d.

Study bolsters Dow safety system for processors

Dow Microbial Control has released field study findings that validate its Advanced Oxidation System Certified technology for pathogen control in food processing facilities.Using air and water, the AOS Certified Whole Room Sanitization creates ozone vapor on-demand and fills rooms with a non-condensing ozone humidity, according to a news release.

Ozone sanitization qualities make the system capable of infiltrating difficult-to-reach areas of a facility, including drains and hidden equipment regions and provide food manufacturers with more protection against pathogens, according to the release.

Three recent studies have validated the product’s ability to control harmful pathogens, including listeria, E. coli and lactobacillus.

During a field trial in a smoked fish packaging facility, the treatments reduced the rate of listeria positives on environmental surfaces from 12% to 0.4% and lowered lactobacillus and E. coli inoculated on agar plates in two other laboratory studies, according to the release.

The process works with wet or dry facilities and because of ozone vapor, no chemical purchases are required, according to the release.

Dow Microbial, a unit of Dow Chemical Co., monitors and certifies every treatment via standardized reports and data for audit purposes, according to the release.

Mold Expert Fry Answers Objections To Use of High Output Ozone Gas in Mold Remediation

High output ozone gas is effective and safe as one of the steps in the mold remediation process, according to mold expert and Certified Environmental Hygienist Phillip Fry.

 

Montrose, MI, August 02, 2014 — “The use of high output ozone as one of the steps in effective mold remediation is often unfairly criticized in internet articles attacking the use of ozone for killing mold,” observes Phillip Fry, Certified Environmental Hygienist, Professional Industrial Hygienist, co-manager of the international EnviroFry environmental inspection and remediation firm, and webmaster since 1999 of the mold education website www.moldinspector.com.

“High output ozone gas for at least eight hours in each treatment area is highly effective for killing mold spores and mold growth that are actually touched by the ozone gas,” adds Mr. Fry, who is also webmaster of the ozone information website www.ozonegeneratorkillsmold.com, a website that sells high output ozone generators.

Mr. Fry provides “the other side of the story” to these four criticisms contained in several internet-posted articles.

1. “The use of ozone generators is not the magic wand that is going to eliminate the tough work of mold remediation—the careful removal of mold-contaminated materials from indoor environments.”

TRUE. High output ozone treatment is only one of the steps for effective mold remediation. For example, EnviroFry not only effectively and safely removes moldy building materials from client buildings, but the company also does other non-ozone remediation steps such as hepa-vacuuming and spraying and fogging mold-killing EPA-registered fungicides.

2. “Pets, indoor houseplants, rubber gaskets, plastic coatings such as electrical wire insulation, fabrics, artwork and other materials and contents in buildings can all be damaged by exposure to ozone.”

OVERSTATED. During high output ozone treatment of a home or other building, and for two hours after treatment, there are NO pets, people, or live plants inside the building. The EnviroFry experience with many mold remediation projects over the years worldwide is that limited duration ozone treatment (e.g., eight to ten hours at a time) has no effect on rubber gaskets, plastic coatings, artwork, or other materials. In addition, artwork and other items can either be removed or covered/wrapped in plastic sheeting during the ozone treatment time.

3. “Exposure to ozone often leads to chest pains, asthma attacks and a number of related breathing problems. Permanent damage can occur from long-term contact, including degradation of the body’s ability to fight respiratory infections.”

MISLEADING. Occupants are not exposed to breathing in ozone because there are no people (or pets) inside the building during the ozone treatment time and for two hours afterwards. After the end of an ozone treatment, EnviroFry immediately opens up windows and uses fans to exhaust ozone-containing air to the outdoors. During such airing out, EnviroFry personnel wear special breathing respirators to filter out ozone during their brief airing-out work inside the building.

4. “High levels of ozone are not sufficient to impact biological contaminants embedded in porous materials.”

TRUE. Moldy porous materials such as drywall are removed and discarded in effective mold remediation. Mold growth is removed from wood timbers by either power wire brushing or baking soda blasting. If the mold growth is too deep into the wood for surface removal, such moldy lumber is removed and replaced with new mold-free, treated lumber that has also been encapsulated (prior to installation) with latex enamel glossy paint containing the EPA-registered mold preventative Tim-Bor. The enamel paint adheres the Tim-Bor directly to the wood to protect against future mold growth and also serves to keep high humidity and water leaks from wetting the replacement timbers.

Mold-exposed clothing should be washed with borax laundry detergent, dry-cleaned (if dry cleanable) or discarded. Similarly, mold-exposed upholstered furniture, bedding, and carpeting should be thoroughly HEPA-vacuumed and scrubbed with a mold removal agent such as boric acid powder, dissolved into hot water. If there is visible mold colony growth in such items, they should be discarded with no effort to mold clean them.

For information about the EnviroFry nationwide USA mold inspection and mold remediation services, email Phillip Fry phil@moldinspector.com, or phone Mr. Fry toll-free 1-866-300-1616 or his cell phone 1-480-310-7970, or visit the company website www.moldexpertconsultants.com.

Contact:
Phillip Fry, Co-Manager
EnviroFry
10104 Sheridan Rd.,
Montrose, Michigan 48457
Phone Toll-Free 1-866-300-1616
phil@moldinspector.com
http://www.moldexpertconsultants.com

Xylem Launches Cutting Edge Ozone-enhanced Filtration System

Xylem Inc. has launched a cutting-edge, ozone-enhanced biologically active filtration system and multi-barrier solution for municipal wastewater treatment. Xylem’s Leopold Oxelia combines ozone, filtration and analytical instrumentation to deliver optimal wastewater treatment for water reuse and discharge into sensitive waters.

Growing populations and decreasing fresh water resources are leading to increased demand for potable reuse of wastewater treatment effluent. Previously difficult to treat pollutants like personal care products (PCPs), active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) and endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) can now be cost effectively removed from a water stream using Xylem’s Leopold Oxelia. This multi-barrier removal opens up increased options for water reuse, including industrial use, groundwater recharge, agriculture and even direct potable reuse.

The Leopold Oxelia system also makes effluent suitable for direct discharge into the most sensitive ecosystems. Around the globe, vital aquatic ecosystems are adversely impacted by contaminants that are not adequately treated by conventional wastewater treatment systems. Public concerns about human health and that of water bodies have encouraged many countries and utilities to develop their own criteria in order to protect vital aquatic environments within their jurisdictions. Switzerland has already set removal of ‘contaminants of emerging concern’ (CEC) as a top priority and recently imposed advanced micro-pollutant treatment for wastewaters into federal water protection laws.

Ozone-enhanced, biologically active filtration systems have lower capital costs than reverse osmosis-based (RO) membrane solutions and, because the systems do not produce another waste stream requiring further treatment, operations are simpler and more cost efficient.

Anton Callery, product manager with Xylem said, ““Xylem’s Leopold Oxelia ozone-enhanced biologically active filtration system harnesses the power of ozone to break down organic carbon compounds and pathogens. Microbes in the filtration system biologically use these smaller, partly oxidized organics for food, resulting in complete biodegradation. Unlike other treatment systems, the compounds are not just concentrated in another waste stream; they are destroyed. Recently tightened regulations, such as in Switzerland, will require the implementation of advanced treatment systems to minimise the quantity of Trace Organic Contaminants (TOrCs) entering the water system and to protect sensitive water bodies as drinking water resources. This solution from Xylem can be used to upgrade existing wastewater treatment plants to meet new regulations.”

“With Xylem’s experience and process knowledge of ozone, filtration and system control technologies, a cost-effective, advanced multi-barrier treatment train that is optimized to reduce energy and loss of water can be designed for a customer’s specific water matrix. Online monitoring in a single integrated control platform provides confidence and control to ensure optimal performance,” concluded Harald Stapel, ozone product manager with Xylem.
Xylem’s Leopold Oxelia is suitable for municipal wastewater tertiary applications of more than one million gallons per day (MGD) (160 cubic metres per hour). Xylem offers comprehensive design support and a process guarantee with the product.

Sharing data between businesses

I recently found the following article.  This is extremely relevant in the world of ozone.  As ozone companies we tend to hide, or keep our data and information from each-other.  Many times our friendly competition double up our research, and sometimes our mistakes.  We need to remember a few things.

#1 rising tides floats all boats.  If the ozone industry grows, each ozone company within that industry has the potential to also grow.  There is tremendous growth opportunity in the world of water treatment for ozone.

#2 the real competition in the world of ozone is actually chlorine and other oxidants marketed by the traditional water treatment companies.  Other ozone companies are only a small amount of our actual competition.

Reconsidering business obstacles to shared data

Something is wrong with how businesses share data. It takes an act of Congress, like Sarbanes-Oxley or similar, to get businesses to actually start to share more data … why is that? Of course, there are very good reasons … but the reasons or obstacles still need to be overcome.

Over the long sweep of time, humans have generally been a lot better off after humans started sharing more and more data. We human beings have probably always learned a lot from each other — sharing data was the original “killer app” that put our species on the map. For a long time, we have learned more from others than we learn from our own experience … language, the written word and printed books help a lot …but information and communication technology has REALLY helped us. We are learning so much now, so much faster … comparing, sorting, sifting, browsing, mulling over shared data … that we are still coming to terms with exactly the rules are for NEW social etiquette and exactly how we should [responsibly] share information. The RULES are still being debated.

But the benefits of drinking from the information firehose are becoming pretty obvious in a private context. Think about how much we depend upon reviews or reputation scores or forum posting to evaluate purchases … commerce is far different than it was 20 years and that change is HUGE compared to the change that happened in the 20 years before that. Consider how the data shared by different people on social networks has accelerated the benefits you enjoy, maybe even faster than you figure out how to enjoy those benefits — think about the way that we stay current [with people that we could not otherwise visit] by looking at posted photos of kids or events or even jokes OR think about blog posts or inside stories from battle fronts or all kinds of information that was effectively unavailable ten or twenty years ago.

Even the bad uses of shared data are probably better than the world before shared data … internet stalking might seem like a bad thing, until one considers that some internet stalking might actually decrease violent paranoid behavior — we might well be considerably better off now in a world where the uber-CREEPY alternative of physical stalking is necessary.

YES THERE ARE ISSUES … but MORE INFORMATION, MORE TRANSPARENCY IS GENERALLY A GOOD THING!

And yet, most business leaders aren’t really buying that … they are not really buying that businesses should be sharing data with other businesses … many are not really buying that data in the cloud is safer than data stored and backed up onsite …very, very, very few are willing to share data with competitors — there are even anti-trust barriers enforced by government to prevent some of this … consider, for example, what would happen if real estate MLSs shared too much data in listing agreements. But as long as we don’t share data, we are missing an opportunity. SOMEDAY SOON, SOMEBODY IS GOING TO FIGURE OUT HOW BUSINESSES CAN SHARE DATA.

Ozone nano-bubble water: a potential treatment for severe gum infections

Tokyo, Sept 12, 2014 – (ACN Newswire) – The study, published in the journal Science and Technology of Advanced Materials, by Shinichi Arakawa and colleagues at Tokyo Medical and Dental University and Japan’sNational Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, evaluated the bactericidal activities of ozone nano-bubble water – also known as NBW3 – against the two main bacterial agents that cause periodontitis as well as its toxicity to human oral tissue cells.

Their results showed that NBW3 can kill periodontal pathogens within 30 seconds of exposure, yet has only a minor impact on the viability of oral tissue cells after 24 hours of exposure.

Based on their in vitro results, the researchers conclude that NBW3 could become a valuable tool for treating periodontitis. However, since in vitro models cannot be directly compared to real-life clinical situations in which oral antiseptics are diluted with saliva, the authors recommend further research to determine the extent to which NBW3’s potency may be reduced by the saliva of dental patients.

Periodontitis is an inflammation of the oral tissues that surround and support our teeth – it is caused by bacteria residing in “biofilms” or dental plaque.

The traditional first step of periodontal treatment involves “mechanical debridement” (i.e. scraping away the dental plaque and dental calculus). Various antiseptics and antibiotics have been used to supplement mechanical debridement.

But antibiotic therapies have several significant drawbacks, such as the selectivity of antimicrobial action, possible development of resistant bacteria, and risk for adverse host reactions. For these reasons, the topical use of a low-cost, broad-spectrum antiseptic agent with low potential for adverse reactions is preferable.

One possible alternative is ozone (O3), which has strong antimicrobial activity against bacteria, fungi, protozoa and viruses, and does not induce microbial resistance. Aqueous ozone is highly biocompatible with oral tissue cells. However, ozonated water must be used within the first 5 to 10 minutes after production to assure its potency.

To address this obstacle, co-author M. Takahashi and K. Chiba developed a patented procedure to produce ozone nano-bubble water. NBW3 retains its oxidation ability for more than six months if protected from exposure to ultraviolet rays. Its high stability allows for the bottling and use of NBW3 as a disinfectant solution.

For further information contact:

Shinichi Arakawa

Tokyo Medical and Dental University

Email: s-arakawa.ltoh@tmd.ac.jp

For more information about NBW3

Masayoshi Takahashi

Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST)

Email: m.taka@aist.go.jp

Reference:

Sae Hayakumo, Shinichi Arakawa, Masayoshi Takahashi, Keiko Kondo, Yoshihiro Mano and Yuichi Izumi: Sci. Technol. Adv. Mater. Vol. 15 (2014) p. 055003. DOI:10.1088/1468-6996/15/5/055003

http://iopscience.iop.org/1468-6996/15/5/055003/

New antiseptic agent holds promise for treatment of periodontitis

A powerful new antiseptic agent, called ozone nano-bubble water, holds promise for the treatment of periodontitis, or severe gum infections, according to research published in the journal Science and Technology of Advanced Materials

The study, published in the journal Science and Technology of Advanced Materials, by Shinichi Arakawa and colleagues at Tokyo Medical and Dental University and Japan’s National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, evaluated the bactericidal activities of ozone nano-bubble water – also known as NBW3 – against the two main bacterial agents that cause periodontitis as well as its toxicity to human oral tissue cells.

Their results showed that NBW3 can kill periodontal pathogens within 30 seconds of exposure, yet has only a minor impact on the viability of oral tissue cells after 24 hours of exposure.

Based on their in vitro results, the researchers conclude that NBW3 could become a valuable tool for treating periodontitis. However, since in vitro models cannot be directly compared to real-life clinical situations in which oral antiseptics are diluted with saliva, the authors recommend further research to determine the extent to which NBW3’s potency may be reduced by the saliva of dental patients.

Periodontitis is an inflammation of the oral tissues that surround and support our teeth – it is caused by bacteria residing in “biofilms” or dental plaque.

The traditional first step of periodontal treatment involves “mechanical debridement” (i.e. scraping away the dental plaque and dental calculus). Various antiseptics and antibiotics have been used to supplement mechanical debridement.

But antibiotic therapies have several significant drawbacks, such as the selectivity of antimicrobial action, possible development of resistant bacteria, and risk for adverse host reactions. For these reasons, the topical use of a low-cost, broad-spectrum antiseptic agent with low potential for adverse reactions is preferable.

One possible alternative is ozone (O3), which has strong antimicrobial activity against bacteria, fungi, protozoa and viruses, and does not induce microbial resistance. Aqueous ozone is highly biocompatible with oral tissue cells. However, ozonated water must be used within the first 5 to 10 minutes after production to assure its potency.

To address this obstacle, co-author M. Takahashi and K. Chiba developed a patented procedure to produce ozone nano-bubble water. NBW3 retains its oxidation ability for more than six months if protected from exposure to ultraviolet rays. Its high stability allows for the bottling and use of NBW3 as a disinfectant solution.