Aerous-8 Oxygen Concentrator

The Aerous-8 Oxygen Concentrator is a turn-key machine ready to use upon delivery.  This is a low cost method to provide oxygen from ambient air reliably.

Aerous-8 Oxygen Concentrator
8 SCFH oxygen concentrator

Operating off 120 VAC power the Aerous-8 only requires ambient air and electrical power for operation.  The air compressor, filtration and all necessary parts for operation are included in one enclosure./

Aerous-8 Pneumatic Diagram

Great for ozone generation and other industrial applications.  The Aerous-8 provides oxygen at up to 10 PSI of pressure.  When used with an ozone injection system the Aerous-8 will produce more ozone from your ozone generator, and provide pressure to push ozone gas into the venturi, therfore increasing flow of oxygen into the water.

Aerous-8 Performance chart

For questions on our oxygen concentrators, contact our application experts today.

Ozone treated drinking water declared best tasting water

The John J Carroll Water Treatment Plant in Massachusetts recently was declared to have the best tasting public drinking water by the AWWA (American Water Works Association).  Water is evaluated much like wine would be to see who has the best tasting water.

A the John J Carroll Water Treatment Plant the water is treated with ozone for disinfection and water quality, but not filtered.  The aquifer the water is pulled from does a great job of filtration.  This provides water quality from the tap water in the area served on par with bottled water.

For more, read full article below:

From: Metro Daily News

Industry group says MWRA water is best

  • By Christian Yapor/Daily News Correspondent

    Posted Jun. 16, 2015 at 8:41 PM 

    Tap water flowing in Framingham, Newton, Southborough, Waltham and Weston has been declared the best tasting public water in the country, according to a national water association.

    To determine which area had the best tasting water, national water specialists from the American Water Works Association (AWWA) conducted blindfolded taste tests.

    “It’s kind of like a wine tasting,” said Ria Convery, spokesperson for the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority (MWRA).

    In the end, the MWRA water won the “Best of the Best” Tap Water Tasting Test. MWRA water originates from the Quabbin and Wachusett reservoirs in central Massachusetts and then flows via underground aqueducts to a filtration plant in Southborough.

    The water filtration plant in Southborough delivers 200 million gallons of water to 51 communities, serving a total population of 2.5 million people – including people in Boston.

    “The reservoir is designed for natural filtration,” said Convery. “We don’t filter, the source is well protected, and most of it is delivered by gravity.”

    The John J. Carroll Water Treatment Plant in Southborough started using ozone to clean the water in 2005 and added the use of ultraviolet light in 2014. Ozone gas is bubbled through the water and is used as a disinfectant. UV light is also used as a disinfectant and can inactivate chemically-resistant parasites such as giardia and cryptosporidium.

    “We are not adding chemicals or taking them out,” said Convery. “We don’t fool around with it a lot.”

    The water that comes from the treatment plant has met every state and federal drinking water standard, according to the MWRA.

For more information on the water treatment plant click here

The water treatment plant provides great information on water quality and how the water is treated with ozone, uv and minimal chemicals.

It is completely possible to bring the same results achieved here to small municipal, industrial, and even residential well water.  Contact us for more details on how we can achieve excellent water quality from your source water.

Ozone used for treating medical waste

Colorado Medical Waste Owner Honored with Sustainability Award at Small Business Leadership Summit in Washington D.C.

Colorado Medical Waste owner honored at Small Business Leadership Summit for commitment to sustainable medical waste disposal practices

Colorado Medical Waste Owner Honored with Sustainability Award at Small Business Leadership Summit in Washington D.C.

Colorado Medical Waste owner Beverly Hanstrom honored at Small Business Leadership Summit for commitment to sustainability

Aurora, CO—Beverly Hanstrom, president and owner of Colorado Medical Waste, Inc. was honored with the 2015 Small Business Majority Sustainability Award at the Leadership Summit, May 11-13, 2015, in Washington D.C. for her commitment to sustainable practices.

Colorado Medical Waste incorporates a process known as ozone medical waste processing, which utilizes ozone gas, electricity and an industrial shredder to turn medical waste into confetti. The process reduces medical waste volume by 90 percent diverting tons of medical waste from landfills, incinerators and hazardous waste facilities with absolutely no emissions, while conserving natural resources. The Small Business Majority Sustainability Award aims to bring awareness to sustainable business best practices and demonstrates how sustainability benefits companies, the environment and all stakeholders, today and for the future. Her environmental stewardship exemplifies the true meaning of sustainability to reduce our carbon footprint. Hanstrom was awarded Small Business Majority’s Sustainability Award which was presented by U.S. Congressman, Mike Coffman (R-CO).

“At the Summit, I had the opportunity to meet the head of the Small Business Administration, Maria Contreras-Sweet. I thanked her on behalf of the SBA for investing in me and my dream to bring ozone medical waste processing to Colorado and for selecting me to participate in the Emerging Leaders program. Sponsored by the SBA, the Emerging Leaders Initiative is an intensive executive-level MBA program intended to accelerate the growth of high-potential small businesses in America’s underserved cities. I was able to meet and take a photo with her and represent the program’s 14 other participants in Colorado.”

Hanstrom also had the opportunity to speak directly to Joseph Goffman, Associate Assistant Administrator & Senior Counsel for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency about outdated federal regulations that hinder implementation of sustainable ozone processing technology.

“It was an honor to represent small businesses across America and to receive the 2015 Sustainability Award from Small Business Majority. It was an unforgettable experience to share our sustainable disposal method with fellow Summit participants and leaders from Obama’s Administration. The event gave me a platform to raise awareness, to promote change and advocate that sustainability and business can go hand in hand. It was a highpoint in my life and my career that I’ll never forget,” said Hanstrom.

This is not the first time Hanstrom has been recognized for her sustainable practices. Under her leadership, Colorado became the third state in the nation to implement ozone medical waste processing technology. In recognition of its game-changing impact, the City of Aurora granted her company the 2014 Business Recognition Award for Environmental Sustainability.

“Clean air, water and land is not a birth right, it’s a responsibility. It’s time to include sustainability in all levels of academic curriculum; in our daily lives and in business because the quality of our lives ultimately depends on the health of our planet. Our future is worth the fight,” said Hanstrom.

For more information about the Summit, please visit: http://www.sbmleadershipsummit.com 
For interviews with Beverly Hanstrom or a member of Small Business Majority, please contact Kelsey Bye at (202) 289-0957 or kbye(at)smallbusinessmajority(dot)org.

 

We have Moved

We have moved.

Ozone Services has been consolidated with Oxidation Technologies. Therefore, there will be no new posts to this site.

Please see our new Blog at Oxidation Technologies for the latest Ozone and Advanced Oxidation news.

 

Oxidation Technologies, has also acquired Gas Sensing, to provide our customers with gas sensors for Ozone, H2O2, Oxygen, and any other toxic gas you may need.

Oxidation Technologies will continue to supply system integration of quality ozone systems along with sales and service of all ozone products.  However, they also provide system integration of Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP) systems along with integrating H2O2, UV, Ozone, and Oxygen systems for water, wastewater, agricultural, and other industrial applications.

Ozone use to extend food shelf-life

Below is a great article on the use of ozone in food storage.  For more info on food processing and food storage see our website by clicking here.Ozone use in cold storage facilities, transport containers, and off the field storage will help prolong shelf life of foods, and helps achieve and maintain an organic rating.Many applications still use methyl bromide or other harmful chemicals.  Ozone use replaced methyl bromide and achieves the same results for pest and bacterial control in food applications.See complete original article HERE

Using ozone to protect papaya exports

May 15, 2015
Using ozone to protect papaya exports
A sliced papaya with seeds and leaves. Credit: 123rf.com

Postharvest diseases reduce the value and quality of agricultural products, leading to economic losses for growers and producers. This is a major issue for agricultural countries like Malaysia, which exports papaya. Current technologies such as synthetic fungicides help minimise these losses, although potential risks to human health and the ecosystem restrict the use of such chemicals.

Led by Professor Asgar Ali, researchers at the Centre of Excellence for Postharvest Biotechnology at the University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus are currently exploring the potential of ozone as a safer alternative to synthetic fungicides. This technology could help maximise profits for producers while improving the safety and quality of for consumers.

“It is saddening that current practices are too dependent on the use of synthetic chemicals – no doubt due to their effectiveness. But our health should come into consideration as well,” says Professor Ali.

To test the effects of ozone, the team exposed freshly harvested papaya to gaseous ozone for 96 hours and then stored it at cool temperatures for 14 days. The results showed that ozone-treated papaya had higher antioxidant activity and higher levels of ascorbic acid, beta-carotene and lycopene than untreated papaya.

Professor Ali’s team also found that ozone treatment can delay and decrease the incidence of anthracnose, a common postharvest disease of papaya, by inhibiting the growth of microorganisms on the surface of the fruit. Ozone is also effective at removing fungicide residues.

Further study confirmed that ozone has similar antimicrobial effects on freshly cut fruits and vegetables, which are generally more exposed to bacterial contamination during the cutting process.

Professor Ali’s team is currently working in collaboration with healthcare technology supplier MedKlinn International to further research on ozone treatment as a safer alternative for food protection. This collaboration will look into the commercialisation of ozone treatment with some fruit and vegetable growers and exporters. MedKlinn will supply an ozone chamber to these groups as a pilot project while Professor Ali’s team will provide technical expertise. This collaboration aims at targeting the fruit and vegetable export companies in Malaysia and recommending the use of as a safe alternative to the control of postharvest anthracnose.

For more info on food processing and food storage see our website by clicking

A second story is also listed below, but can be found here in full

Ozone Can Protect Exotic Fruits from Disease, Decay

Malaysian researchers are developing an ozone treatment to protect papaya and other exotic fruits from diseases and decay during storage and transportation.

Postharvest diseases reduce the value and quality of agricultural products, leading to economic losses for growers and producers. This is a major issue for agricultural countries like Malaysia, which exports papaya. Current technologies such as synthetic fungicides help minimize these losses, although potential risks to human health and the ecosystem restrict the use of such chemicals.

Led by Prof. Asgar Ali, researchers at the Centre of Excellence for Postharvest Biotechnology at the University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus are currently exploring the potential of ozone as a safer alternative to synthetic fungicides. This technology could help maximize profits for producers while improving the safety and quality of agricultural products for consumers.

“It is saddening that current practices are too dependent on the use of synthetic chemicals – no doubt because of their effectiveness. But our health should come into consideration as well,” says Ali.

To test the effects of ozone, the team exposed freshly harvested papaya to gaseous ozone for 96 hours and then stored it at cool temperatures for 14 days. The results showed that ozone-treated papaya had higher antioxidant activity and higher levels of ascorbic acid, beta-carotene and lycopene than untreated papaya.

Ali’s team also found that ozone treatment can delay and decrease the incidence of anthracnose, a common postharvest disease of papaya, by inhibiting the growth of microorganisms on the surface of the fruit. Ozone is also effective at removing fungicide residues.

Further study confirmed that ozone has similar antimicrobial effects on freshly cut fruits and vegetables, which are generally more exposed to bacterial contamination during the cutting process.

Ali’s team is currently working in collaboration with healthcare technology supplier MedKlinn International to further research on ozone treatment as a safer alternative for food protection. This collaboration will look into the commercialization of ozone treatment with some fruit and vegetable growers and exporters. MedKlinn will supply an ozone chamber to these groups as a pilot project while Ali’s team will provide technical expertise. This collaboration aims at targeting the fruit and vegetable export companies in Malaysia and recommending the use of ozone treatment as a safe alternative to the control of postharvest anthracnose.

Ozone used to extend shelf-life of food receives funding

Ozone use for food processing is gaining popularity.  Ozone can be used to extend shelf-life of food in storage, cold storage and food processing.  Ozone will eliminate bacteria and mold in the air that will grow on the produce and cause premature rot.  Ozone will also break down ethylene safely in the air.  ethylene can ripen fruits and vegetables faster, by breaking down ethylene gas in the air fruits and vegetables will last longer in storage.

Recently a company in Scotland received funding to research this in depth.  Read full article here, or below

Company aiming to lengthen food shelf-life secures £2m of funding

A SCOTTISH company which has developed ozone-generating technology aimed at enabling a longer shelf-life for food and sterilising medical devices has secured £2 million of funding.

Anacail, a spin-out from the University of Glasgow’s School of Physics and Astronomy, has attracted London-based Sussex Place Ventures, which specialises in funding early-stage technology businesses, as a new investor in the equity funding round.

IP Group and the taxpayer-backed Scottish Investment Bank, both existing shareholders, also put up funding in the latest round, as did a small number of private individuals.

Anacail, which employs four people including chief executive officer Ian Muirhead, is working with several food-processing companies on the commercial application of its technology.

Mr Muirhead noted that these companies were trialling Anacail’s devices in manufacturing environments.

He highlighted his hopes that products benefiting from Anacail’s technology, which is aimed at improving food safety as well as extending shelf-life, would start to be seen in shops next year.

Anacail noted its technology had applications in the hospitality and catering, as well as the retail, sectors, and could play a part in food decontamination from “farm gate to plate”.

Mr Muirhead said that the technology was being evaluated by companies with a view to introducing it in food-processing to increase the shelf-life of products.

He noted that the technology involved the conversion of some of the oxygen in the air into ozone, which is described by Anacail as a “potent germicide”, within a sealed container.

Mr Muirhead emphasised that there would be no leakage of the ozone, which decays to oxygen within a short period, to the “outside world” from the container.

Anacail’s process uses “cold plasma” technology, with a high-energy electric field inside the packaging breaking down the oxygen into single atoms, which are then converted into ozone.

Oxygen exists in air as two-atom molecules. Ozone molecules comprise three oxygen atoms.

Explaining its technology, Anacail, which means “shield”, “preserve” or “protect” in Gaelic, says: “After a short time, all the ozone decays back to oxygen, leaving no residual chemicals, and a decontaminated or sterilised package and contents. Because this innovative approach offers rapid, safe and chemical-free sterilisation, the technology can be applied wherever there is a need to reduce microbial contamination inside sealed packaging.”

Mr Muirhead noted that the process could reduce bacteria, mould and yeast on the surface of food, straight after packaging.

Anacail is also aiming to apply its technology in “high-level decontamination within healthcare settings”, and sterilisation of medical devices.

Noting that Anacail had developed a prototype of its technology aimed at the healthcare sector, Mr Muirhead said the company was speaking to a number of original equipment manufacturers which were potential partners in this area.

He said these potential partners were firms that had medical devices on the market and were looking to bring sterilisation products that could be used with them. He noted that, because this potential use related to regulated products, this was a longer process.

Mr Muirhead said that a repeat-use medical device could be put into a package, treated to ensure high-level decontamination and then stored until it was ready to be used again.

He added that the technology could be used for medical devices featuring complex electronics or optics, made of materials that could not withstand high-temperature sterilisation, such as flexible endoscopes or ultrasound probes.

Mr Muirhead said that, following the latest funding round, the University of Glasgow and the management of Anacail would between them have a stake of less than 50 per cent in the company.

Anacail had, he noted, secured seed funding back in November 2012.

Mr Muirhead was pleased with the level of interest shown in Anacail by potential investors.

He said: “We spoke to a number of investors and they were very interested to move quickly.”

He added: “It is early-stage technology. I think we are well-placed to bring it to the market.”

Anacail recently appointed former Geest chief executive Gareth Voyle as its chairman. The company, still based at the University of Glasgow, has also appointed two specialist advisers, Liz Kynoch and Jonathon Lintott.

Ms Kynoch was previously group technical director at supermarket group Tesco. Mr Lintott co-founded Andersen Caledonia, a Scottish infection-control firm, and has experience in the installation and operation of sterilisation equipment and the manufacture of medical disposables.

Anacail and the University of Glasgow were recently awarded a £300,000 Innovate UK Biomedical Catalyst grant to develop the company’s application of ozone in medical device sterilisation and decontamination.