Product Spotlight: 5000BF Ozone Generator

5000BF Ozone Generator

The 5000BF Ozone Generator is capable of producing 7 g/hr of ozone from oxygen, or 1.8 g/hr of ozone from dry air. This generator is perfect for all kinds of applications, from personal use to industrial settings, as well as experimental testing. The compact design (6x12x17) and affordable pricing make it a great option for many different uses.

Key Features:

  • Great value in ozone generators
  • Air cooled ozone generator – no cooling water required
  • Adjustable ozone output 0-100%
  • Integrated oxygen/ozone flow meter
  • Integrated amp meter to show electrical discharge to cell
  • Benchmount with durable rubber isolation feet
  • High quality aluminum enclosoure
  • Compact size and easy to use
  • Corona discharge ozone generator cell

Specifications:

  • 7 g/hr ozone output from 3 LPM oxygen
  • 1.8 g/hr ozone output from 5 LPM dry air
  • 5 PSI pressure rating (can operate under light vacuum also)
  • Dimensions: 6-inch high x 12-inch wide x 17-inch depth
  • Weight: 8 lbs
  • Feed-gas: Dry air, or Oxygen

For more information, as well as purchasing options, Please Click Here

In this video, we used the MAX-5 Oxygen Concentrator to supply our feed gas, Please Click Here to view all of our Oxygen Generators.

Ozone Mass Transfer – What is so Important?

Having the proper ozone equipment is only part of the solution. Ozone is a gas and is generated in situ. Making sure that this ozone gas is transferred into a liquid and then mixed properly is very important. This process is known as ozone mass transfer.

Making sure that the ozone is properly dissolved and allowed a complete chemical reaction of the gas is how to ensure a reliable ozone mass transfer. Most failures of ozone applications are the results of faulty ozone mass transfers.

The Solubility of Ozone and Importance of Choosing Correct Mass Transfer Devices

Temperature has an effect on the different solubility of ozone. Ozone is able to dissolve more and easier in cooler water. Because of this, ozone doses for the for the same applications will differ from country to country. When a proper ozone mass transfer is conducted, it will enhance the solubility levels of ozone, thereby ensuring required actions of ozone. A list of simple mass transfer devices are:

1) Hydro injector/ venturi/ eductors

2) Diffusers

3) Static mixers

4) Mass multipliers

5) Combination of the above

Venturis: These devices use high water pressure to suck the ozone into the water. They achieve at least 90-95% efficiency because of their design. The pump required has to be sized properly, or there will be ozone leakages.

Diffusers: These are devices that bubble ozone across water in order to diffuse it into the water. They work under normal water pressure. The number of diffusers needed will be determined by the volume of air, and surface area of the contact tank. Diffusions requires a minimum bubbling height of 5-6 meters for maximum efficacy. Some problems that arise from diffusing is the channeling of bubbles, and inadequate gas liquid contact. Because the diffusers is always in contact with high concentration ozone, it is important that the diffuser is made of the right material. SS or ceramic diffusers are the most preferred materials. For waters with high turbidity, diffusers are not recommended. Ozone destructors are also needed for the destruction of any unused ozone.

Static Mixers: These are devices placed in a pipe that are always used in conjunction with venturis. If used after venturi injections, they increase the ozone mass transfer. The material of construction is also very important here as well. SS 316 are normally used.

Mass Multipliers: These are devices that are placed in pips that discharge water mixed with ozone under high pressure into the water. They are normally used for large applications and in conjunction with venturis. Mass Multipliers are normally made of Kynar plastics.

Combination of Devices: A combination of mass transfer devices are often used. Combinations work efficiently and will guarantee higher percentage of mass transfer. However, in larger applications, it can also increase the cost it takes for mass transfer. This is something that is very important to keep in mind when planning your method of mass transfer.

Other factors that determine the efficiency of the ozone mass transfer are:

1) pH of the water: needs to be between 7-8 pH.

2) Temperature of the water: the higher the temperature the less the ozone will dissolve.

3) The concentration at which the ozone is used. The higher the concentration, the more ozone will dissolve.

4) The pressure: ozone mass transfer under pressure is recommended and this can reduce ozone dose, since efficiency is very high.

5) The design of the contact tank: ensures that the diffused ozone is efficiently mixed in the water.

Other Forms of Ozone Mass Transfer: There are also some unconventional types of ozone mass transfer that can be used with equal efficacy. U Tube devices are one of these methods. U Tubes have water that is forced into the tube under pressure and the water mixes within the pipelines when the direction of the water if forcibly changed. Essentially, it is like using a diffuser system under pressure. A U Tube system that is designed properly can have an efficiency of over 95%.

The smell of rain… Ozone!

It is commonly said that the smell of ozone is present after a rain storm. This is true, and some great data I read this week explains this further. Read the whole article here.

From the article, it explains that ozone can be be detected BEFORE it rains.

Before it rains, as the wind begins to pick up and the clouds thicken or roll in, you may become aware of a noticeably fresh scent in the air. That sharp, clear aroma is ozone, a molecule made up of three oxygen atoms bonded together (O3) whose name comes from the Greek verb for smell, ozein. It’s the same gas we associate with the layer of our atmosphere that protects us from too much sunlight. As unsettled weather approaches, ozone is carried to the ground in strong downdrafts that, once they hit the earth, move horizontally as strong, gusty winds that precede the arrival of the rain. That wind, or “gust front,” and the smell of ozone that’s carried in it, reaches your nose a short time before the approaching rain arrives.

The act of rain falling from the sky further creates an extreme downdraft of air and pulls more ozone gas to the surface of the earth so that after a rain, the odor of ozone is still present.

It is important to note that while ozone is generated from lightening in a rain storm this is not the cause of the majority of ozone detected at ground level. So, the next time you “smell” rain, you can thank God for the gift of ozone and science for helping us understand it!